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November 06, 2009

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You might (I hope) be able to make Issue 2 work for you. Once the board is up and running, there'll be a lot of opportunities for campaigns like, "Ohio, when you voted for Issue 2 you thought you were voting to stop cruelty to animals. But look at what the board is permitting: ..."

Don't frame it as "you voted for something that protects factory farms" (even if that's what happened). Frame it as "factory farms are using loopholes in Issue 2 to get away with cruelty, and the board is letting them do it." Then when you put forward your own initiative, it's not "repealing" Issue 2--it's fixing it, making it do what the voters thought it would do.

Thanks for the comment Shoutingboy! I think that's a good suggestion, and one that we will certainly consider as we plan our messaging. Stay tuned!

Shouting boy makes an excellent point. In a sense, a "report card" on this board after the first few months or year can make a message that everyone understands.

I bet money that the other side will say that there is no place in our Constitution for this type of thing. A good response is that you would have worked through the legislative system, but b/c issue 2 is in the constitution, the only way to close the loop holes is through the constitution.

Additionally, I was surprised the media didn't jump all over issue 2 as being a quack job (no pun intended). It would be impactful for a tv station to actually tour a factory farm and see for themselves. Couple that with a farm here in Ohio that treats its animals well in order to demonstrate it can be done. Finally, have Ohioans speak for Ohioans. Although I hold the HSUS in high regard, I was disappointed to see them writing the opposing view point on issue 2 in the Columbus Dispatch when the Ohio Farm Bureau guy was writing the pro.

Keep up the good work Farm Sanctuary!

David, thanks for your comment. I agree that Ohoians who care about animals have an important role to play in fighting the abuses of animal agriculture. And national organizations including Farm Sanctuary and HSUS need to be diligent in pointing out that they speak on behalf of thousands of members who are Ohioans.

As for showcasing an Ohio farm that “treats its animals well,” we may have a difference of opinion about what that means. In Farm Sanctuary’s view, treating an animal well is not compatible with killing it for food. So-called “humane” animal agriculture is not all it is cracked up to be; see http://www.farmsanctuary.org/issues/factoryfarming/humane_labeling/truth_behind_labeling.html for more on that.

But certainly, most people can agree that the confinement practices used in factory farms are unacceptable by any standard.

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Farm Sanctuary is the nation's leading farm animal protection organization. Since incorporating in 1986, Farm Sanctuary has worked to expose and stop cruel practices of the "food animal" industry ... read more.

Making Hay with Gene Baur features personal blogs from Farm Sanctuary President & Co-founder Gene Baur, as well as other entries focused on Farm Sanctuary’s advocacy efforts and the multiple ways that you can get involved and make a difference for farm animals.

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Gene Baur, President and Co-founder of Farm Sanctuary

Gene grew up in Hollywood, California and worked in commercials for McDonald's and other fast food restaurants. He adopted a vegan lifestyle in 1985, and today, he campaigns to raise awareness about the negative consequences of industrialized factory farming and our cheap food system. He lives in Washington, DC and is the co-founder and president of Farm Sanctuary. Read more.

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